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Health & Wellness

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="center" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_column_text] Physical Fitness Guidelines [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]Many musicians would not consider their work athletic, but musicians are actually known as the athletes of the small muscles. With the exception of some lead vocalists and instrumentalists, most musicians are not running and jumping about the stage, but the oxygen demands of your muscles when playing still require a robust delivery system for optimal functioning. This is the job of your cardiovascular system. Studies have shown that in performance (when adrenaline levels are high) musicians’ heart rates can spike anywhere up to 85% of the total maximum heart rate, which is considered to be high intensity work in sports medicine guidelines. In order to protect your heart health when working at these intensities, you need to be fit for the job![/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text] Reducing Injury Risk If oxygen delivery to muscles is not optimal it places them at greater risk of injury and increases muscle soreness. Additionally, low cardiovascular fitness leads to...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] While most of us understand the connection between healthy eating habits and physical fitness, fewer know of the effects of food on mood. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="center" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_single_image image="1035" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][vc_empty_space][vc_raw_html]JTNDYSUyMGl0ZW1wcm9wJTNEJTIydXJsJTIyJTIwaHJlZiUzRCUyMmh0dHBzJTNBJTJGJTJGYmFja2xpbmUuY2FyZSUyRndwLWNvbnRlbnQlMkZ1cGxvYWRzJTJGMjAxOSUyRjEwJTJGZm9vZC5wbmclMjIlMjBkb3dubG9hZCUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIycWJ1dHRvbiUyMCUyMGJpZ19sYXJnZSUyMGNlbnRlciUyMGRlZmF1bHQlMjIlMjBzdHlsZSUzRCUyMiUyMiUzRURvd25sb2FkJTIwdGhpcyUyMFJlc291cmNlJTNDJTJGYSUzRQ==[/vc_raw_html][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] The gut and the brain are intimately connected through something known as the gut-brain axis, and science tells us that the health of our gut bacteria has a direct influence on our emotional state. [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="center" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_column_text] How does food affect our mood? Our gut contains trillions of micro-organisms that are collectively known as the microbiome. Disruption of the microbiome from eating unhealthy foods has been linked to the development of anxiety and depression. Additionally, the gut bacteria produce and regulate 95% of the body’s Serotonin (a neuro-transmitter that plays a vital role in regulating our mood, appetite, and sleep cycle) so healthy...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="center" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="center" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_column_text] Research has shown that up to 74% of rock and jazz musicians experience some form of hearing disorder although very few take measures to protect their hearing.  [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text] Damage from Noise Exposure While exposure to high decibel (Db) sounds can be damaging, what is most important is the length of time we are exposed. We can tolerate sounds at less than 80Dbs (alarm clock) for prolonged periods without incurring any damage. Above 85Dbs (snowblower) we will start to incur damage depending on how long we are exposed to the sound. We can be exposed to 85 Dbs for up to 8 hours before inducing damage, but for every 3Db increase the exposure time is cut in half. Below is the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidelines for continuous noise exposure in a 24 hour period. 85Db 8 hours 88Db 4 hours 91Db 2 hours 94Db 1 hour 97Db 30...